• Welcome

    Welcome!

    Welcome to Face the Fear!

    We are Nicole Ellsworth and Kaitlyn Duchien, two motivated millennials on a journey to face the fear of our financial future.

    We created this safe space where we will dive into topics like retirement, budgeting, student loans, investing, insurance, financial terms, etc. We are passionate about educating ourselves and others in the process. Join us as we change the conversation around finances and approach our future with confidence.

    If you like us, follow us here, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and subscribe to our podcast: Face the Fear. (Social media links are on the top right of this page.)

    *Disclaimer: We are not here to give legal financial advice. We highly encourage you to bring the topics we discuss to a financial professional, who is qualified to address your specific financial goals.*

    It’s time for some real talk, and we are so excited that you are here to join us!

    Until next time – Face the Fear!

    Nicole and Kaitlyn

  • Videos,  Wedding

    Our Story Q&A! We’re ENGAGED!

    Join us on our 22 hour road trip from Texas to Michigan! We answer all your questions about how we met, what challenges we have in our relationship, and how we’ll handle our finances as a newlywed couple.

    (Public Service Announcement: This video is LONG. So long, in fact, that we almost ran out of gas in the middle of nowhere Arkansas because we didn’t realize how long it would be. Miraculously, we made it to a gas station on fumes & somehow filled my 14-gallon tank with 16 gallons of fuel. We also conveniently grabbed lunch from the gas station Subway, where the lady, as she prepared our sandwiches, explained in graphic detail how she’d recently castrated her goat. All that to say, THANK YOU for watching this video. Our followers make it all worth it.)

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    Podcast: Face the Fear (on iTunes, Stitcher, Spotify, and Google Play)

    Contact Us: facethefearfw@gmail.com

  • Budgeting,  Wedding

    7 Steps to Set and Follow a Wedding Budget

    Written By: David Hessel

    A wedding can be an exciting time, and sometimes it can be easy to let your emotions get the better of you and spend more than you anticipated on spending. While it is a special day in your life, it is important to set and stick to a budget you can afford so you do not have the stress of paying off excess debt when you are embarking on the next stage of your life. So how can you stay on track with your wedding budget and still have a day you’ll never forget? Take a look at these 7 tips.

    1. Take a Hard Look at Your Finances

    The first step, and most often the least exciting when planning an event, is taking a good, hard look at your current financial situation. You will need to come up with an amount that you will be able to save in time or that you can afford to cut from your budget or savings accounts. Once you have determined the most you can spend, a number 10 to 20 percent less, that will give you your budget range. While this can be an awkward conversation for many new couples starting out, it is a good way to build a strong foundation for discussing money matters throughout your marriage. 

    2. Create a Reasonable Guest List

    One of the largest expenses of a wedding is the food and drink, and the amount you will need to provide for your guests will have a direct effect on the total costs. While it can be tempting to invite everyone that you know, including distant family you may rarely contact, it is best to set an amount on your guest list that is reasonable and stick to it. Start out by determining numbers for close family and friends to make sure you have the most important guests on the lists before you begin adding more.  

    3. Determine Contribution Amounts From Others

    While some couples may tackle their wedding expenses all on their own, often times the bride’s and groom’s family will contribute to the wedding expenses. It can sometimes be awkward determining how much they plan to contribute or what items they plan on paying for, but it is an important discussion to have sooner rather than later. Just remember that if you accept monetary contributions from family, they will probably expect to be able to provide some input. 

    4. Create a Wedding Account to Stay on Budget

    The best way to stay on budget and keep track of your wedding spending is by opening a banking account and setting aside the money budgeted in it. Use the money in the account only for the wedding expenses. If you end up with some extra in the account at the end, you will have some spending money for your honeymoon or be able to pick up a couple of items from your registry.

    5. Decide What Parts of the Wedding Are Most Important to You

    There are primary parts of your wedding that will require a significantly larger expense than others such as the food and the venue rental. Though aside from the standard big-ticket items, wedding expenses can come with a wide range of price tags. Determine with your future spouse which items you are willing to splurge on and which items you care about less. You may be willing to choose a more reasonably priced dress to be able to have an open bar, or limit flower options to have a live band for music. Have some fun and plan a date night where you write a list of your wedding priorities.

    6. Set a Budget-Friendly Wedding Date

    Having flexibility in your wedding date is a great way to shave some bucks off of your budget as well as get the vendors you want most. Some of the most popular times of year to have weddings are around holidays so it is best to avoid these weeks as you may have problems securing a vendor or be required to pay an increased rate. Your specific area may also have seasonal trends with popular wedding months. If this is the case, choosing an off-month will give you the best bang for your buck.

    From personal experience, allowing yourself to enjoy your engagement and waiting 2-3 years before the big day gives so much flexibility with spending and discounts. One example here is, typically when you book a vendor, they will lock you in at current pricing. (ask if not clearly stated) Most are bound to increase over the next 2-3 years; so by giving yourself more time to plan, you end up saving a decent amount of cash too.

    7. Fight the Urge to Splurge

    It can be easy to get caught up in the money and excitement of unique items that will make your wedding perfect. Just remember that it is the wedding vendors job to upsell as much as possible to try and resist the temptation to have add-ons as they can cause your budget to quickly get out of control. It is also good practice to make sure you bring a list with you when picking up wedding items, so you do not find yourself distracted and purchase items you do not need. 

    Try following the seven tips above to give you a better chance of staying on budget while still having the wedding that you always dreamed of. 

    Looking for more guidance on how to budget for your big day? Schedule a 30-Minute Phone Call with David Hessel here or send him an email at dhessel@gvcaponline.com.

    You can find the original article here.

    Global View Capital Advisors, LTD is an affiliate of Global View Capital Management, LTD (GVCM).  GVCM is an SEC Registered Investment Advisory firm, headquartered at N14W23833 Stone Ridge Drive, Suite 350, Waukesha, WI 53188. PH: 262.650.1030. David Hessel is an Investment Adviser Representative (“Adviser”) with GVCM.  Additional information can be found at:https://www.adviserinfo.sec.gov/IAPD/

     Global View Capital Insurance, LTD. (GVCI) insurance services offered through ASH Brokerage and PKS Financial. GVCI is headquartered at N14W23833 Stone Ridge Drive, Suite 350, Waukesha, Wisconsin 53188-1126, PH: 262-650-1030. David Hessel is an Insurance Agent of GVCI.

  • Budgeting,  Podcast,  Wedding

    Face The Fear Podcast – Wedding Planning with Event Extraordinaire, Andi Jo Clark!

    Join us as we chat with Andi Jo Clark, Event Director at Union 12 about all things weddings, planning and budgeting for your big day! (We even dish out some non-financial wedding tips!) 🙂 

    Andi Jo Clark – Event Director at Union 12 (Event Center & Banquet Hall):

    Face The Fear: 

  • Videos,  Wedding

    How To Talk Money with Your Future Honey

    Let’s talk money, honey! (How To Build A Budget with Your Babe)

    Planning a wedding is overwhelming, and often, building & sticking to a budget can be the most stressful part. For many couples, creating a wedding budget may be the first time they’ve seriously talked about finances together. It’s so important to build a solid financial foundation before entering into your newlywed life. Here’s a few tips for talking money with your future honey so planning a budget will be a piece of (wedding) cake!

    According to The Knot’s 2018 Real Weddings Study, the national average cost of a wedding is $33,931. YIKES! How do you plan a wedding without going broke? How do you talk to your parents, fiancé, and future-in-laws about a wedding budget? How do you start your marriage with a solid financial foundation?

    Our Face The Fear Bridal Series is here to tackle all of these questions AND MORE! Thank you for watching this video!

    Contact Us: facethefearfw@gmail.com

  • Podcast

    Face The Fear Podcast – Jordan Bell & Steven Gansey – Sports + Finance!

    Jordan Bell joins us again on this episode of Face The Fear, along with Steve Gansey, head coach of the Fort Wayne Mad Ants (NBA G League)! We talk about sports, money, life lessons, and of course…basketball. 

    Jordan Bell: @jbgoodpeople

    Face The Fear:

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    • Twitter – @Face_The_FearWebsite – www.facethefearfw.com
  • Videos,  Wedding

    How to Plan A Wedding Without Going Broke

    #FaceTheFear Wedding Series

    According to The Knot’s 2018 Real Weddings Study, the national average cost of a wedding is $33,931. YIKES!

    How do you plan a wedding without going broke? How do you talk to your parents, fiancé, and future-in-laws about a wedding budget? How do you start your marriage with a solid financial foundation?

    Our Face The Fear Bridal Series is here to tackle all of these questions AND MORE!

    Thank you for watching this video! Don’t forget to like and subscribe!

    Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/face.the.fear/

    Twitter: https://twitter.com/Face_The_Fear

    Podcast: Face the Fear (on iTunes, Stitcher, Spotify, and Google Play)

    Contact Us: facethefearfw@gmail.com

    The Knot’s 2019 Real Wedding Study

  • Podcast

    Face The Fear Podcast – Jamal Robinson & Justin Davis, Entrepreneur Rockstars!

    In this week’s episode, we chat with Jamal Robinson and Justin Davis. Both are active in the Fort Wayne community and are entrepreneurs. We talk about inspiration, leaving a legacy, Believe In A Dream, starting an eye wear business, making connections/networking and a bit about sports. 

    Jamal’s contact information is below:

    Justin Davis Instagrams:

    Face The Fear: 

  • Podcast,  Retirement Planning

    Face The Fear Podcast – Erin Martin, Retirement Plan Adviser, Take 2!

    In this episode, we welcome back Erin Martin, Retirement Plan Adviser at Phillips Financial to talk about 401(k)’s, retirement accounts, vesting and withdrawing money from your 401(k) and how that can impact your long term goals.

    Joining us in this episode is Nick Lucas and Nick Shoemaker, students at the University of St. Francis!

    Instagram: face.the.fear

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    Email: FaceTheFearFW@gmail.com

    Don’t forget to subscribe, leave a review and share!

    XOXO – Nicole and Kaitlyn

  • Budgeting,  Wedding

    Tips to Talk Finances With Your Spouse

    Do you talk finances with your spouse? No? Well, you should. As awkward as it maybe, it is so important to have regular discussions over your financial situation.

    Now, I know this might be tough if there is a dark cloud over your finances, and may cause disagreements, but sweeping it under the rug only makes it worse. I assume there is some sort of discussion related to this subject, but is it a quick “honey, did you pay the rent?” or is it a full-on conversation related to goal setting, where you are at, where you want to be, and the steps you are taking to get there? There is a HUGE difference. Don’t get me wrong, you can still ask if the rent is paid but having the actual in-depth discussion behind that question is what is so important.

    Finances are one of the biggest causes of divorce in the US. I don’t mean to be a Debby downer, but it is a fact. By having these discussions and putting the work into creating a successful financial future, this can help you to avoid being in that statistic.

    Awkward Andy Samberg GIF by Brooklyn Nine-Nine - Find & Share on GIPHY

    To make this a little less awkward, I have some tips to help lighten the load:

    • Icebreaker: That initial conversation is probably going to be the toughest to start. Make it comfortable. Schedule a time to sit down to a nice dinner or get in your pjs and talk money with pizza. Anything to make the situation more relaxed. Try to start by discussing the positives of your finances. Maybe you saved an extra $300 this month, or you raised your 401k contribution, literally anything positive. Doing this can help get you both in a good mood. If there is nothing positive to start off with, maybe bring in a solution to an issue. Say you have a massive medical bill due this month, instead of just looking at the fact that you are going to spend a ton of money that maybe you do not have, look on the bright side that at least after this month you won’t have that bill and you can put that money into savings next month. Get creative and try to keep the mood light. The discussion will be more productive if you are both happy.
    • Do not lie: This is probably THE most important tip I can share. Hiding items related to money is the easiest way to cause an argument and create issues. It is so much better to get everything out into the open so together you can take the steps to make it right. No matter how embarrassing it is, or how big of a burden it may be, you are in this together. In my opinion, I would much rather hear the bad news up front and work through it than be lied to about it as the problem is getting much bigger. Be open and communicate the issues. This is so important.
    Will Smith Truth GIF - Find & Share on GIPHY
    • Use tools: There are so many resources out there to help you reach your financial goals. From budgeting websites, spreadsheets, templates, books, the list goes on and on. Find a tool that works best for you and your spouse. If you budget monthly and like apps there are sites such as Mint or Everydollar. If you budget weekly and like to have a paper copy, maybe you find a spreadsheet that you can fill in. Anything to help make it easier. This can also help make future conversations a breeze to get through. On top of that, you will visually be able to see how you are doing and stay on track.
    • Make goals: By setting financial goals you and your spouse will have something to work towards. Instead of waiting for the next paycheck to blow on food- guilty, say you made a goal to pay off your car 1 year quicker, now you have a purpose for the money that betters your future. These goals can be short term or long term, or even better a mix of both. Consider writing these down somewhere, your phone, computer, notebook, etc. Being able to see them will help make it harder to give up on them. Make sure they are goals you both agree on and benefit you both.
    • Make a plan and stick to it: Whether this is a budget, or a 5- year plan, make a plan. Discussing what you want to achieve and talking about how to get there is a great step, but really getting down deep and planning everything out will help you realize what you have to look forward to, what you can do right now, or where you are making mistakes. If you do not have a basic household budget yet, that might be a good place to start. Find a way that works best with your pay schedules and stick to the budget. From there, start making a longer-term plan. For example: In 5 years you and your spouse are going to build a house and to get there, year 1 you are going to cut the amount you eat out in half every month and put that money into savings, year 2 you are going to do so and so…and year 3 and 4 and so on until you build the house. Hang your plan on your fridge and talk about it frequently. Keep your budget, or plan in front of you so you can keep each other accountable if one of you starts to fall of track. Teamwork makes the dream work!
    Save Them All Best Friends GIF by Best Friends Animal Society - Find & Share on GIPHY

    Hopefully these tips help you and your spouse start the conversation for your financial future. Talking about money does not have to be awkward. If you take the time to create a more relaxed environment and discuss the positive things you have or can do, in my experience, it helps so much. This is the person you are stuck with forever, make sure you are both on the right page to have a successful future!

    Author: Dakota Otis